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The North Springs Improvement District is seeking developers to buy part of the Heron Bay Golf Club in Coral Springs.

The NSID, which provides water and drainage services for much of Parkland and Coral Springs, has the 220-acre shuttered golf course at 11801 Heron Bay Blvd. under contract for $32 million. It will convert much of the site into a preserve with walking trails and stormwater retention ponds. However, it has decided to sell 69 acres of the property along Nob Hill Road.

The North Springs Improvement District wants to sell 69 acres of the Heron Bay Golf Club in Coral Springs.
(IMAGE CREDIT: KATALYST REAL ESTATE)

Fort Lauderdale-based Katalyst Real Estate, led by President Don Ginsburg, was hired by the NSID to market the property. The NSID issued a request for proposals to consider bids for the land.

Ginsburg said the NSID wants to sell commercial development on the site for a use that will draw residents from the surrounding community. The only restriction is that the land can’t have homes. The RFP documents mentions about 20 retailers the community would like to see there, including bowling alleys, high-end retailers and sit-down restaurants.

 

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Though it would have been miles from Oakland Park’s downtown, elected officials rejected a proposed self-storage center earlier this week, saying they want to nurture development near neighborhoods as carefully as they’re doing so downtown.

Storage complex rendering

The three-story, architecturally ornate self-storage center would have been fine with the neighbors next to it, off Oakland Park Boulevard west of Interstate 95. But city officials said they could do better.

Oakland Park is in the midst of a development transformation — or at least an attempt at it. City officials say they want better development — higher quality housing and the businesses that would follow.

“This request to me is asking this body to relent on that hard work we put into unifying our city, and to renege on the commitments that we made,” Commissioner Michael Carn said.

The vote against rezoning for the project was 4-1, with Commissioner Matthew Sparks the only supporter.

The three-story complex was proposed for 2.5 acres at 2203 W. Oakland Park Blvd., behind a Burger King restaurant and kidney dialysis center, in front of the Sailboat Pointe Condominium, which issued a letter of support.

Mayor John Adornato said the city’s intense focus on improving downtown development standards will eventually lift up the other Oakland Park neighborhoods, like the one where the storage center was proposed.

In May, the city took the rare step of enacting a temporary building moratorium for small housing projects downtown, in order to change development rules.

“The work is just one in a menu of things the city is doing as it re-evaluates where we are at as a city and most importantly, who we want to become,” City Manager David Hebert said. “This is a small piece of a very large whole, and we begin with this step.”

Until Oct. 18, no applications to build townhouses, duplexes, villas and garden apartments are to be processed for the downtown area. The long, thin downtown zone stretches from Oakland Park Boulevard to about 43rd Street, straddling Dixie Highway and the railroad tracks, between 10th and 13th avenues.

The city is fostering a culinary district downtown, often citing the Funky Budddha Brewery at 1201 NE 38th St. as an anchor. A Lucky’s Market will open there in late August

After suspending property owners’ rights with the moratorium, the city hired consultant Leigh Kerr and Associates to study the downtown. He issued his recommendations. Kerr suggested the city build its population via new housing.

“New homes would be a base to support business because retail follows residential,” Kerr said.

By the time development is allowed to resume in October, the city hopes to have changed development laws to encourage the small housing developments to better connect with the street and be more pleasing to the pedestrians who might pass them. Gone would be chain-link fences, vast parking lots in front of buildings and buildings set 10 or 15 feet back from the street.

“The rules discussed and the moratorium itself pertain just to small-scale housing developments, not big multi-family apartment complexes, which the city favors,” David Hebert said

In another legal change aimed at elevating the city’s image, commissioners tentatively agreed to phase out what a city memo called “unsightly” barbed wire or razor wire fencing, except at business that are zoned “light industrial,” like an auto yard.

The vote also would spiff up requirements for outdoor storage yards at commercial businesses, so fencing hides the clutter. Businesses would have until 2020 to follow the new rules, which need a final approval at a future meeting.

Click here to view the SunSentinel news video ‘Oakland Park Nixes Development Project

 

Source: SunSentinel

Developers of a planned mixed-use project on one of the last pieces of agricultural land in Palm Beach County just moved a step closer toward building the project.

The Palm Beach County Commission on Wednesday approved a multiple land-use amendment for the Johns Glades West property. Schmier & Fuerring Properties, Giles Capital Group and Rosemurgy Properties want to develop the 38-acre property, at 95th Avenue and Glades Road just east of State Road 7 and west of Boca Raton, into a mix of apartments, restaurant and retail space.

According to the county’s approval, the developers, who declined to comment, could potentially build 304 apartments and about 165,000 square feet of commercial and/or retail space in the as yet unnamed development.

But that number is raised to 456 units with a bonus density. All multifamily developers in unincorporated Palm Beach County are required to build workforce housing, and since the developers plan to build 25 percent of the apartments as working housing — more than required — they are entitled to a bonus density of 50 percent. That translates into an additional 152 units.

The multiple land-use amendment was approved with certain conditions, such as an agreement to limit the bulk of potential traffic to off-peak hours, a feat to be accomplished by an emphasis on entertainment and restaurant venues that would attract more traffic at night than during the day.

The next step is a rezoning hearing on May 25. The land is currently zoned for agriculture with a future land-use designation of low-rise residential (three units per acre). The developers are requesting to change the zoning to higher density residential (eight dwelling units per acre) and commercial.

 

Source: The Real Deal