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Pricing and cap rates for Class A industrial product are expected to stabilize for the remainder of this year, according to a new report from Cushman & Wakefield—though trophy properties in the Inland Empire of Southern California, New Jersey, South Florida, Seattle, and Dallas will reap the most aggressive overall rates.

Spring 2021 data from C&W shows that overall capitalization rates range widely by asset class, with a nearly 90 basis point difference between Class A and B industrial product and a 235 bps difference between Class A and C industrial facilities. And overall rates for Class C properties are clocking in 143 bps higher than their Class B counterparts.

Average cap rates for Class A assets ranged from between 3.25 and 5.5% in spring 2021 and declined by 33 basis points year over year, while Class B went down by 58 and Class C assets declined by 89 bps since last spring. And while demand for Class A product in core US cities has been strong, over the past five years rates began to stabilize.

“Little if any additional compression is expected for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022, with investors closely monitoring interest rates and 10- year Treasury yield rates,” the report states.

Cap rates for Class B and C product are logging the largest decreases as investors target more of the former to generate higher yields and returns from higher-priced Class A assets. The average for Class B product this spring fell between 4 and 7%, while the average cap rates for Class C assets ranged between 5 and 9%.

“Due to the lack of available and higher priced Class A product, investors are now targeting Class B and, in some cases, Class C product, seeking higher yields/returns—especially from those assets located near populated urban areas,” the report states. “Product close to urban areas has become the driver in order to reduce shipping and, more importantly, delivery times.”

 

 

Source: GlobeSt

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As industrial took off in 2020, so did new construction in Florida markets. In many of those areas, completions have reached historic levels.

In the second half of 2020, large-scale speculative construction projects or expansions at existing industrial parks were announced in multiple Florida markets, according to Cushman and Wakefield’s “Florida Industrial Construction” report.

There was 15.4 million square feet (MSF) under construction at the end of 2020. In addition, another 29.7 MSF is poised to come online in the next three years.

Out of this new construction, speculative building dominated. At the end of 2020, 5.8 MSF of speculative building had been completed. C&W says Build-to-Suits accounted for 43% of all completions. Many of those speculative projects under construction have yet to attract tenants. By the end of 2020, only 56% achieved any pre-leasing.

“In several cases, developers moved ahead with entitlements hoping to land a sizeable build-to-suit for a new-to-market or expanding tenant,” according to C&W.

Drilling down into individual markets, Miami leads the way with 8.7 million square feet of industrial space proposed. Tampa Bay (6.0 million), Lakeland (5.8 million), Jacksonville (3.7 million), Broward (2.4 million), Orlando (2.0 million) and Palm Beach (1.2 million) are next.

Tampa Bay leads with 3.4 million square feet of industrial space under construction. It is followed by Miami (2.7 million), Broward (2.2 million), Orlando (2.2 million), Jacksonville (1.9 million), Lakeland (1.7 million) and Palm Beach (1.4 million). The highest preleasing was found in Lakeland (91%), Jacksonville (84%), Orlando (60%) and Miami (50%).

In a recent report focusing on Jacksonville, Colliers International found that construction, which represents about 1.9% of the current industrial stock, created a “trickle-up” effect where industrial users are shedding dated space for quality new construction product. The trend has produced a combination of rising industrial vacancy—which hit 5.4% in the fourth quarter—and rising rents—which increased to $5.21 per square foot.

While other asset classes are closely monitoring the vacancy rate—typically because a rising rate leads to tempered if not negative rent growth—Colliers says that increased vacancy is actually a welcome relief in the Jacksonville industrial market. In 2018, the local vacancy rate reached lows of 2%, giving users limited options. Today, the increased rate of 5.4% still points to healthy market conditions, and new construction activity is well matched to demand.

Nationally, industrial space is getting absorbed. In a recent report, Moody’s Analytics said the warehouse/distribution space absorbed 35.4 million square feet in Q4, its highest mark since Q1 2019 when 70.7 million square feet were absorbed.

Construction for the new warehouse/distribution space fell to 25.8 million square feet in Q4 after hitting 38.2 million square feet added in Q3, according to Moody’s Analytics. The space has posted an average of 36.8 million square feet of new inventory added per quarter in the prior six quarters.

 

Source: GlobeSt.